25 Corny “Compelling” Plots


These randomly generated plots – not to be taken seriously – are from
banner_Writers Plot

Seriously, would you consider any to be worth considering?

  1. An agent quarrels with an intellectual missionary.
  2. A manipulative pilot has limited time to hijack a truck full of sick monkeys. The circumstances are commenced by a robbery.
  3. An aging warrior questions a handsome football player.
  4. A priest falls for an untrustworthy model. Events are concluded by an arrest.
  5. A warrior has a day to transport – across enemy territory – a possessed toy.
  6. When a mistake is made, a disparate group of experts – brought together by an eccentric millionaire – go on a jungle trek. The plot is begun by money going missing.
  7. An artist saves the life of a happy-go-lucky gold digger. The story is commenced by money going missing.
  8. A failed Sunday school teacher quarrels with a doddery robot. The circumstances are made more complex by a ticking bomb.
  9. A school girl buys an invisible car. The story is resolved by a new witness.
  10. When they have to turn down their ideal job, a family of oddballs go on the rampage. The situation is reduced to chaos by a surprising revelation.
  11. When a conman takes their money, a group of mercenaries find a buyer for a bankrupt holiday resort. Events are reduced to chaos by the arrival of the police.
  12. When they discover that someone is trying to kill them, a coachload of drag queens use the information given by their dying guide to find: an out of the way railway station. The situation is encumbered by a fire.
  13. An imaginary friend fights with an untrustworthy doctor. Events are resolved by a storm.
  14. When a storm washes out the bridge, a class of snotty prep school kids find money to buy an overgrown garden. The situation is split wide open by an invasion.
  15. A sexy crook seduces a straight talking housewife.
  16. A disinterested truck driver is blackmailed to carry out a mysterious disappearance. The situation is encumbered by the imminent destruction of the base.
  17. A government clerk has 24 hours to finance a deal that will save thousands of jobs. The situation is reduced to chaos by the real perpetrator.
  18. An aging little old lady is arrested for blackmail.
  19. A nanny and a religious trawlerman combine forces to go on a riverboat trip. The circumstances are encumbered by a wedding.
  20. An immoral manager has 24 hours to find a replacement. The plot is commenced by a new job.
  21. A dog lover borrows a magic ring. The situation is encumbered by the discovery of the missing papers.
  22. An undertaker has a day to expose the conspiracy.
  23. A rich secret agent is arrested for corruption. The plot is made more complex by a meeting.
  24. An assassin has limited time to find the professor who knows how to stop the disaster.
  25. An unkempt daughter has limited time to use the information given by their dying guide to find: a network of secret underground tunnels.

Visit their site (click on the image) and try finding one worth your while

Break In


They stood on the front porch, stymied and stupified. Dylon had no key to the front door, and Linda hadn’t brought her key. She’d assumed Dylan would have his with his car key. No.

The spare key lock-box was empty. That meant Adele had taken it, either into her room or – as her car was nowhere to be seen – out with her.

“Let’s call Adele,” said Linda.

Dylan wouldn’t hear of it. No way was his daughter going to learn he’d forgotten to take his key with him.

“We’ll go to the back.”

Linda stretched on tiptoe to reach over the gate to unlatch it.

“I can get a spare key from the garage,” Dylan said. He went through his pockets as he approached the garage door. “Shit. I haven’t got the garage key either.”

Linda checked the doors, just in case they’d left one unlocked. No such luck.

Dylan steamed, Linda fumed…who each was blaming, neither would ever say.

Dylan examined each door…the sliding doors to the lounge and the bedroom were tamper ptoof, as was the wooden door to the laundry.

But…the laundry window?

Dylan turned the screen locks and removed the screen, leaning it against the wall. He didn’t for a minute believe it would, but he tried lifting the sliding window…and it slipped up and out easily.

So, who was to go in through it? Dylan knew he was too large and, at 71 a little too limited.

“I can do it,” Linda said. “I just need something to step up on.”

Thank heavens for absent-minded handyman husbands – he’d left two saw horses outside. Dylan placed one under the window – sort of. One foot was higher than the other three, and as the wall planter for their herbs was right below the window there was quite a space between the saw horse and the sill. Which was at Linda’s bust height.

Now, Linda had her own structural problems, neither age-related, even though she was 65 years old. One hip joint had been replaced, botched, and replaced again, leaving her with the leg an inch shorter than its mate, and limited movement. She had had surgery on the other leg to excise melanoma from the groin, so big a mass and so entwined around the tendons and arteries the surgeon had needed to scrape the cancer from the tendon – leaving even less movement possible.

But, of the two, Linda was the only one who could fit through the window.

She needed a boost from Dylan, but made it to stand on the saw horse. Now, how to pass through the window, now looking much smaller.

“Go through on hands and knees,” Dylan suggested.

Linda couldn’t get a knee up to the sill. “No, I’ll do it this way.”

“Perhaps I’d better try.”

“No, I can do it'” She shuffled herself around on the saw horse, until she had her back to the wall. With her hands behind her on the sill, and one foot on the garden tap, she boosted herself up into the window frame. Not comfortable when it’s an aluminium frame, with a slot-and-groove track for a sliding window pane!

She lifted a cheek so the grooved track fitted more comfortably. Only, now she was facing sideways, but still with both legs hanging off the sill. The leg closest to the window was the least useful leg. Try as she did, the bloody leg would not bend close enough to let her foot pass the frame – even after Dylan pulled her sneaker off.

“Leave it,” Dylan said. “I’ll think of something else.”

“No way – this is fun.”

“Try going through backwards.”

That was going to be awkward – an acrobat Linda was not. She shifted around again. First one cheek, then the other, passed that darned track. Where next…this needed some thinking. If I put my left hand down on the hot tap, and my right hand on the front edge of the tub,  I can start to let myself down onto the washing machine.

She set the plan in motion – and ended up flat on her back on top of the machine, her legs still up on the window frame.

She walked her feet along and down the wall as she turned herself to face the room, all the while laughing like a crazy woman at what she must look like (were anyone watching).

Once on her feet, she unlocked the laundry door for Dylan. He passed her and went to the door into the bathroom.

Shit, oh dear, he had locked the bathroom door from the inside before they’d gone out! Still no entry to their own house!

Dylan remembered he had tools in the boot of the car. Using a screwdriver he popped the bolts from the door hinges, then levered the door out of its frame, hoping the bolt bracket wouldn’t break the door. But no … success. They were in.

Tempting though it was to leave the door between bathroom and laundry, to let Adele see the open plan layout created by her key forgetfulness, Dylan set about replacing the bathroom doors’ locks with ones that could be opened from the “wrong” side, and setting another lock box out beside the lounge door.

The only real disappointment? No one had filmed her hilarious cat burglar impersonation!

What Happens When We Judge a Book by Its Cover?


Of interest to any Indie Author…
Thank you Kristen

Kristen Twardowski

Neverwhere and Enclave Rankings.PNG

People usually respond in one of two ways to the phenomenon of judging a book by its cover; they mourn man’s shallowness, or they consider a book’s marketing potential. But how much does the look of a book matter? How do people feel about book covers? And how do those feelings relate to the scores that books receive on review sites like Goodreads? Several digital technology people went on a mission to find out.

A year and a half ago Dean Casalena and Nate Gagnon launched Judgey, an online game that let people rank book covers. The covers used were all modern editions of books, and all (or nearly all) of them were released by a major publishing house. The covers chosen did not belong to a single genre. Books by Ernest Hemingway and Harper Lee appeared alongside Twilight and The Hunger Games. Ultimately players of Judgey evaluated over 3 million…

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Will I Float Or Will I Fly?


I thought I’d float within my dreams,
Lying languidly in a boat,
Drifting with the flow of lazy streams
Amid lilac-tinted water lilies,
Like the lady of the lyrical poem…
Drift, float… float without a helm
To end where the stream of life ends.

But, no, I didn’t float. I flew
Through my dreams, through a dark azure sky
Over navy seas bespeckled by reflections
Of moon and stars on wave tops;
Over cream-rimmed dark islands,
Twinkling with open fires far below.

I didn’t float, I flew; not gently,
But furiously fast, fantastically far.
High above the world I know,
Then over new worlds, flying low
To see the strange, the new
Places and people, none I knew.

I felt disquiet, sought familiar places,
But none were here, and with a bitter thrill
I swooped to return to known faces,
Known arguments, old disputes
Fast friends and firm promises…
I flew back, to reassurance.

I’ve not written any poems for some while now.

The Daily Prompt theme “Float” brought me to compose this… Be kind.

Longest Placename…


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Taumata whakatangi hangakoauau o tamatea turi pukakapiki maunga horo nuku pokai whenua kitanatahu…

…is the longest placename in New Zealand, maybe even in the world with its 86 letters. It’s roadside directional signpost has been ‘nicked’ many times over the years. I found this sign among the exhibits in the British Car Museum (in Clive, Hawkes Bay, NZ) – obviously donated by someone who ‘found’ it.

What does it mean? The place where Tamatea, the man with the big knees, who slid, climbed and swallowed mountains, known as ‘landeater’, played his flute to his loved one.”

Of course, locals simplify it to Taumata Hill.

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Brought to mind by the photo challenge of the week: NAME

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First 2017 prompt :: YEAR


Well, the Daily Prompt folks have delighted me, by not making 1st January’s prompt “Resolutions”. Thanks for the common sense, good folk. It would have been too easy, too over-done, too lazy … for any  to really give a toss about. So … “Year” – ‘A Year Of…’, ‘A Year For…’, ‘A Year In…’, ‘A Year With…’ – endless possibilities here. (You can probably tell I’m desperately thinking as I write this.) What will I wrap ‘Year’ around? Well, regardless of it being too obvious, it’s my view on 2017; plans? promises? problems? (Nah, not problems-let’s keep it positive.) politics? (Nah, not politics-let’s keep it positive. Did someone just say that?)  It’ll definitely be a year of remembrances and anniversaries, some light, some dire…

2017 Anniversaries

500 years:
– Martin Luther nails his 95 Theses to the doors of Wittenberg Castle’s Church (October 31)

150 years:
– Creation of the Dominion of Canada (July 1)
– Publication of Karl Marx’s Das Capital (September 14)

125 years:
– Début of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes (October 31)

100 years:
– Centennial of the U.S. Entry into World War I (April
– US President John F Kennedy born (May 29)

75 years:
– Commencement of the Battle of Stalingrad (July 17) which continued to February 2, 1943

50 years:
– Hollywood releases “Bonnie and Clyde,” “In The Heat of the Night,” “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,” “I Am Curious Yellow”, and (December 21) “The Graduate”.
“After decades of studio rule, the gloves were off, battle lines drawn and silver screen taboos toppling like dominoes.”*
– Monterey Pop Festival (June 16-18); With performances by Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Otis Redding and The Who — before they were superstars
– Release of “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” (June 1); Also (no precise date) “The Doors” (The Doors), “Surrealistic Pillow” (Jefferson Airplane), “Are You Experienced?” (Jimi Hendrix Experience), “The Velvet Underground & Nico” (The Velvet Underground)
– Canada’s Expo 67 (April 27-Oct. 29)
– “Hair” opens off-Broadway (Oct. 17)
– Aretha Franklin’s “Respect” hits No. 1 (June 3-10

– the Biafran War (more correctly The Nigerian Civil War) with which came the formation of Doctors Without Borders began (6 July 1967)
– Commencement of the Six-Day War between Israel and Egypt (June 5–10)
– Greek monarchy is overthrown (April 21)

– Death of Che Guevara (October 1)
– World’s first heart transplant (December 3)

48 years:
– Woodstock, the bigger, more iconic touchstone for hippie music gatherings.

40 years:
– “Star Wars” hits theatres (May 25)
– “Roots” becomes a small screen phenomenon (Jan. 23-30)
– Elvis Presley dies (Aug. 16)

30 years:
– “Dirty Dancing” screened.

25 years:
– Johnny Carson steps down from “The Tonight Show” (May 21)
– Nirvana’s “Nevermind” hits No. 1. (Jan. 11)

20 years:
– Ellen DeGeneres comes out as TV’s first gay leading character;
– “The Lost World: Jurassic Park” screened;
– Pop band Backstreet Boys emerged

*Source: Joel Rubinoff, arts and family columnist at the Waterloo Region Record.

A response to the Daily Prompt for 1st January, 2017. Link-back will have to wait, as using the iPad App is not conducive to popping back n forth to get it.

2017, A Hopeful New Year – More Or Less


I do hope 2017 sees me more productive, more effective, more efficient, more fortunate (both in terms of fortune, and luck), more healthy, more academic of thought, more politically aware, more active (physically and socially), more spiritual (actively, not alone), more gentile, more and more free-to-be-me than in years up to now.

But there are also things I feel hopeful should be less, not more. I’m hopeful I’ll have less cravings for cigarettes (off cigarettes themselves, but triggers still twitch), less jittery, less dependent, less doubt about myself, less worried about others’ opinions, less clumsy, less fearful, less weary, less garrulous, less judgemental of others, less stressed by small things.

I’m hopeful I’ll be able to walk the treetops suspended pathway in the Redwoods forest (here in Rotorua) – so I have work to do on my fear of heights. I’m hopeful I’ll be able to start learning to swim – started, but agoraphobia triggered by the broad expanse of the pool’s wide open space (its surface) brought on a melt-down. Both of these conditions hit me at about the time Stiff Persons’ Syndrome did.

I’m hopeful I’ll get lots (and lots, and lots) more work done on my memoir. And I’m hopeful I’ll get myself cracking on writing and submitting shorter works to…whoever wants them. But this is also where hope is not enough. One must have a stern resolution to achieve what one hopes for. Which means setting down the “How To …”, and the “When To…”; so, a schedule, a “To Do” list…all of which do actually become a delaying tactic, a side-track. Getting ready to work is not the same as actually Working, is it?


What’s the betting the daily prompt for the 1st January (US time) will be Resolutions?
(This was intended to suggest a post for the last day of 2016, but I’m in the GMT +13 (NZDT) time zone, so I’m writing this on Sunday 1st January.)